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5 Things to Delete From Your Facebook Page

Do you really need to share all of that information?

April 9, 2018

It is time to do some serious Spring Cleaning on your Facebook page. Today is the day the social media giant will begin contacting users to let them know if they were part of the 87 or so million users that's data was harvested by Cambridge Analytica

Facebook will notify you on your timeline and let you know what APPs used or may still be using your data. All 2.2 billion users will receive a notice titled "Protecting Your Information" with a link to see what apps they use and what information they have shared with those apps. If they want, they can shut off apps individually or turn off third-party access to their apps completely.

So with the data breach and all the negative light around Facebook, I thought today would be a great day to do some Facebook Page cleaning. Here are five things you should remove from your page!

1. APPs that access your data like your contacts and other private information. We seldom read the privacy notices or the user agreements before we click "I agree" and this is why some people were blindsided by the news their data may have been shared. But see if you read through the lengthy terms of Facebook's privacy policy or the user agreement, you would know that they were collecting some of your data. 

2. Your Birthday! But how will people know when to wish you a happy birthday and leave all of those messages on your timeline? If you share your actual birthdate, it makes it much easier for people to figure out other information on you like your address and maybe even your bank account information. 

3. Fake Friends or people that cause drama!  I do find it hard to completely delete someone because I hate confrontation. It's easier to unfollow someone or just straight up using Facebook's reasonably new mute feature that makes that person's updates vanish from your timeline for 30 days. 

4. Photos of your children and family: Unless you have your page super locked down when it comes to privacy settings, you should avoid posting photos like this because anyone can access them and steal them for some other use. Plus, we all need to consider what the person in the photo will think five years down the way about that photo or information you shared with everyone. 

5. Location services/Check-Ins: Again, if you only share your status updates with close family and friends, you may not need to worry about this. But if you have a public profile, this means anyone can find out your location at any time. I often see people checking in at home. What are you thinking? You're giving your address out to anyone who wants it. 

Social Media has made us live less private lives. With the click of a button, we can share all kinds of information with anyone. But you should consider what you're posting before you click share. Could this information come back to bite you? Are you putting yourself at risk for being stalked or robbed if you're talking about going out of town? Should you post those photos of your kids online? 

Perhaps this Facebook Cambridge Analytica scam will help people get back to living more private lives. 

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